Webinar Video Archive

Webinar Video Archive

Increase your knowledge in systems engineering

All of Vitech’s webinars are recorded and available for on-demand viewing. Browse our list below. Webinars are cataloged by year.

Register for upcoming webinars here

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  • Schema and Metamodels and Ontologies, Oh My! with David Long

    Description

    Over the last five years, there has been a growing fascination with conceptual data models, metamodels, and ontologies in systems engineering. Practitioners have begun to develop their own conceptual data models and ontologies. But often, as systems engineers experiment with these capabilities, they develop custom languages for their projects without the greater depth or consideration necessary to connect enterprise practices. In this webinar, David Long explains how to properly leverage these ideas to advance your projects and your enterprise.

    • Reusable Lists and Specializations of Failure Modes
    • What differentiates the concepts of data models, metamodels, and ontologies, and why you should care.
    • About the fundamental information model that underpins systems engineering, and how it lives implicitly in the process standards that guide our practice.
    • Why it’s important to move from implicit to explicit knowledge capture.
    • How not to fall into the trap of “define and use.”

    Video Link

      Schema and Metamodels and Ontologies, Oh My! with David Long
  • Enhanced Failure Modes and Effects Analysis FMEA Capabilities in GENESYS with Brian Selvy

    Description

    Learn about the updated FMEA extension for GENESYS. The presenter will give an overview of the new capabilities, and will demonstrate the full feature set, including traceability back into a robust MBSE project. Learn how the new FMEA extension allows you to create:

    • Reusable Lists and Specializations of Failure Modes
    • Failure Causes
    • Failure Effects
    • Failure Detection Methods
    • Failure Prevention Controls
    • Mitigation Activities

    Video Link

      Enhanced Failure Modes and Effects Analysis FMEA Capabilities in GENESYS with Brian Selvy
  • What's New in GENESYS 2020 R2 with David Long

    Description

    A fundamental strength of GENESYS is the autogeneration and automated maintenance of diagrams. GENESYS 2020 R2 takes this capability to a new level. While there is more to GENESYS 2020 R2 than diagramming, a best-in-class diagramming framework allows you even greater power and effectiveness in your communications. The new features are so easy to use even our CEO can do it!

    In this webinar, you’ll learn about the new features in GENESYS 2020 R2, which allow you to:

    • Enhance formatting for diagram content
    • Hide diagram content (“eliding” in the language of SysML)
    • Use rule-based formatting for rich, effortless visualizations
    • Benefit from multiple views per diagram type to enhance communication and analysis
    • Leverage additional refinements to enhance your MBSE experience

    Video Link

      What's New in GENESYS 2020 R2 with David Long
  • Developing the Next Generation of Model-Based Systems Engineers with Ray Hudson

    Description

    For decades, we have taught engineering undergrads the tools to perform engineering analysis, design, verification, validation, and certification. This led to systems of increasing capabilities and complexity. As we work to develop the next generation of systems engineers from a foundation in model-based systems engineering (MBSE), it can be argued that we are now extending the engineering education into the realm of knowledge modeling, capture, and management.

    This presentation will highlight the author's approach to the development and implementation of a senior-level, elective course in large-scale, aerospace model-based systems engineering which focuses on a DODAF-compliant (with extensions) metamodel language. The intent is to present lessons from the classroom which can be used at other universities or within corporations as they develop their systems engineering workforce. The binding context of this language and teaching method is an approach that stresses relationships across operational, functional, and physical system architecture modeling domains.

    This context provides emphasis that separates the customer's problem space (operational) from the system contractor's design solution spaces (functional and physical). We specifically cover risk and metrics concepts to show how consideration of these areas is a rich source of derived requirements that will ensure success of the specific engineering development activity intended to meet and surpass customer needs.

    Video Link

      Developing the Next Generation of Model-Based Systems Engineers with Ray Hudson
  • SysML “AND” Its Role and Place in Systems Engineering with Zane Scott

    Description

    This webinar will discuss the use of SysML in the context of the systems engineering practice, taking the position that it has definite value but is one of a number of tools and approaches available to the serious systems engineer. Systems engineering is increasingly called to confront problems that arise outside the traditional spaces of hardware and software—problems that involve sociotechnical and natural systems. This demands that we speak the languages of the owners and stakeholders of such problems. For that we must equip ourselves to go beyond the realm of hardware and software, beyond the reach of SysML, to communicate about those problems and our proposed solutions. We will see ways in which the systems engineering thinking and toolbox can be made large enough to confront the problems facing our 21st century world.

    Video Link

      SysML “AND” Its Role and Place in Systems Engineering with Zane Scott
  • Unlocking MBSE and the Systems Engineering Source of Truth with David Long

    Description

    “It’s too complex.” “I can’t show these diagrams to my management.” “Others can’t get the information they need.” “There’s no way I can deploy this within our organization.” We’ve all heard these charges or some variant of them. Resistance to model-based systems engineering takes many forms, and the objections are often valid. Even those who embrace SysML as a useful notation for systems engineering recognize that we need to do more to increase its usability, effectiveness, and accessibility. So what can we do today as individuals and organizations seeking to advance our application of model-based systems engineering?

    In this practical webinar, we will look at how to ease the burden of MBSE while enriching the value. Systems engineering is a collaborative, transdisciplinary activity. Our tools and techniques should further the required communication and collaboration, not impede it. Calling on the help of a powerful tool, we will look at how to make MBSE information and artifacts more accessible to all involved in a systems endeavor.

    If your chosen implementation is SysML, how can we leverage these standard representations while effectively engaging the greater team? If SysML is not for you, how can we still apply MBSE and improve collaboration across the enterprise? With or without SysML, the right mindset and implementation unlocks MBSE, advancing the application of systems engineering within the organization while providing access to the critical information across the enterprise.

    Video Link

      Unlocking MBSE and the Systems Engineering Source of Truth with David Long
  • Vitech's First Live Online Town Hall

    Description

    In the absence of face to face conversations, we would like to connect with you via a community town hall. To that end, we are hosting Advancing the State of the Art of Model-Based Systems Engineering.

    At this online town hall, any question or suggestion related to systems engineering, MBSE, and Vitech is fair game. We’ll entertain questions such as:

    • What’s new with GENESYS 2020?
    • How do organizations best deploy MBSE?
    • What is the role of MBSE in Digital Engineering?
    • What is the role of SysML in the future of MBSE?

    We hope to share with and learn from you as to how we can achieve an evolution—not a revolution—in our thinking and approach, an evolution that offers transformative results.

    Video Link

      Vitech's First Live Online Town Hall
  • There is No Such Thing as Non-Model-Based Systems Engineering

    Description

    Models are the basis of all communication and thinking. As we form ideas, we think in models. As we communicate our ideas to others and absorb their thoughts, the communication is done in models. Successful communication rides on making those models match so that the ideas are accurately passed among us. The issue is not whether we use models but where those are kept. The presentation will address how we use models, where we keep and maintain them in order to promote efficient communication and how we can most efficiently and effectively communicate them.

    Video Link

      There is No Such Thing as Non-Model-Based Systems Engineering
  • 4 Ways to Put Your SE Model to Work with GENESYS with David Long

    Description

    We put traditional analytical engineering models to work every day. Whether evaluating loads and stress, fluid dynamics, or circuit loads, sophisticated models enable us to reliably repeat calculations, demonstrate feasibility, and evaluate alternatives. But what about the descriptive architectural models that are the foundation for model-based systems engineering? Done well, these models capture the journey from first statement of need through requirements, architecture, and test. They reflect design and specification for detailed engineering. But can they do more?

    In this practical webinar, we will look at four ways you can make your descriptive architectural model work for you. All four will be discussed at a conceptual level and demonstrated using GENESYS™. Ranging from basic concepts of automated document generation to more powerful concepts such as design consistency and evaluation, these techniques coupled with the right systems engineering environment help maximize your return on investment from MBSE.

    Video Link

      4 Ways to Put Your SE Model to Work with GENESYS with David Long
  • The Power and Promise of GENESYS: A Model-Based Systems Engineering Tool for Our Time

    Description

    As digital engineering changes the way we live and work, systems engineers are turning to model-based engineering software to help them navigate the complexity. GENESYS—an enormously powerful model-based systems engineering tool—addresses our 21st century challenges with an underlying systems metamodel.

    Learn how easy it is to use GENESYS to create a model, collect requirements, add an activity, analyze the architecture, conduct a simulation, create automated views of the model, and perform verification and validation. Discover how GENESYS supports broad connectivity, a comprehensive understanding of the problem domain, and completeness of design. Finally, learn about the connectors that allow you to leverage the power of GENESYS across other platforms, such as Excel Connector, Simulink, and ModelCenter.

    Video Link

      The Power and Promise of GENESYS: A Model-Based Systems Engineering Tool for Our Time
  • How Concurrent Systems Engineering Can Help Your Organization with Mark Malinoski

    Description

    Concurrent model-based systems engineering is becoming critical to a successful engineering outcome. It requires that systems engineers and subject matter experts collaborate on design solutions. In order to facilitate this, it is necessary to realize a practice and toolset based on a proven systems-metamodel that enables the design team to instantiate their system model in an enterprise-class database. With a robust API that connects with the tools and processes of subject matter experts and other engineering disciplines, concurrent model-based systems engineering becomes indispensable in addressing the engineering challenges of our time. This is the power and promise of MBSE 2.0.

    Video Link

      How Concurrent Systems Engineering Can Help Your Organization with Mark Malinoski
  • 'GENESYS and ModelCenter for MBSE 2.0' with Mark Malinoski and Scott Ragon

    Description

    Connecting Vitech’s GENESYS with ModelCenter MBSE allows engineers to perform architecture trade-off studies and validate system requirements using any software application.

    Run the connected software to:

    • Validate system requirements
    • Run a full suite of trade studies (sensitivity analysis, DOE, optimization) to find improved system designs
    • Update the system model with design results
    • Capture requirements traceability and validation in the system model

    Connect any software application to Vitech GENESYS, such as:

    • COTS tools such as Excel®, MATLAB®, and Simulink®
    • CAE Tools such as HyperWorks®, ANSYS®, NASTRAN®, and ABAQUS®
    • CAD Tools such as Creo®, NX®, CATIA v5®, and SolidWorks®
    • Legacy FORTRAN or C++ applications
    • Python, Java, and VB scripts
    • Databases and PDM/PLM solutions
    • Almost anything else

    Video Link

      'GENESYS and ModelCenter for MBSE 2.0' with Mark Malinoski and Scott Ragon
  • Introduction to GENESYS 7.0 with Mark Malinoski

    Description

    In releasing the latest version of our powerful model-based systems engineering software—GENESYS—Vitech enhances the capabilities of this robust tool. In this webinar, Mark Malinoski will highlight:

    • The enhanced connection of architecture and analytics with the new ModelCenter MBSE connector
    • New model management capabilities, including reuse of patterns and library components
    • An alert framework notifying users when their selected aspects of the model change
    • Enhanced configuration management capabilities, enabling teams to implement their desired configuration management approaches
    • Usability feature, notably spellcheck, and control of the diagram frameblock

    Video Link

      Introduction to GENESYS 7.0 with Mark Malinoski
  • 'MBSE 2.0 for Interfaces' with Mark Simons

    Description

    Concurrent model-based systems engineering is becoming critical to a successful engineering outcome. It requires that systems engineers and subject matter experts collaborate on design solutions. In order to facilitate this, it is necessary to adopt a methodology and a toolset based on a proven systems-metamodel, enabling the design team to instantiate their system model in an enterprise-class database. With a robust API that connects with the tools and processes of subject matter experts and other engineering disciplines, concurrent model-based systems engineering becomes indispensable in addressing the engineering challenges of our time. This is the power and promise of MBSE 2.0.

    Video Link

      'MBSE 2.0 for Interfaces' with Mark Simons
  • 'MBSE 2.0 – A New Performance Level for Engineering Enterprises' with David Long

    Description

    Concurrent model-based systems engineering is becoming critical to a successful engineering outcome. It requires that systems engineers and subject matter experts collaborate on design solutions. In order to facilitate this, it is necessary to adopt a methodology and a toolset based on a proven systems-metamodel, enabling the design team to instantiate their system model in an enterprise-class database. With a robust API that connects with the tools and processes of subject matter experts and other engineering disciplines, concurrent model-based systems engineering becomes indispensable in addressing the engineering challenges of our time. This is the power and promise of MBSE 2.0.

    Video Link

      'MBSE 2.0 – A New Performance Level for Engineering Enterprises' with David Long
  • 'Introduction to GENESYS 6.0' with Ron Kratzke

    Description

    GENESYS 6.0 enhances and strengthens capabilities that bring even more power to the skilled systems engineer: a new integration with Simulink, custom connectors and utilities, enhanced existing connectors, increased ability to manage your model and configuration, an improved block diagram experience, and even greater capability to produce on-point reports. In this webinar, Principal Systems Engineer Ron Kratzke will walk you through the new features of GENESYS 6.0, allowing you to refine your skills whether you benefit from years of experience or are just beginning your model-based systems engineering journey.

    Video Link

      'Introduction to GENESYS 6.0' with Ron Kratzke
  • More Agile than Agile: A Layered Approach to MBSE with Zane Scott

    Description

    Solving complex problems in an agile and responsive manner has become the order of the day. Meeting this challenge while maintaining the discipline of the systems view is the focus of a layered approach to systems solution design. The layer-by-layer approach advances the design quickly and responsively without losing focus on system implications. It imposes design discipline without burdening the process and holds all four domains in relationship at every stage of development. This allows the approach to manage complex problems in an agile and responsive way with a high quality solution as its result.

    This webinar discusses this layered approach to system design and improvement. It shows the way to a process that is more agile than the traditional plan-driven methods and at the same time, maintains a disciplined system view that avoids the pitfalls of component engineering. We will discuss the concept of systems thinking, see the importance of understanding the business process components of the system, and explore the delivery of capability that is value-adding for the customer.

    Video Link

      More Agile than Agile: A Layered Approach to MBSE with Zane Scott
  • Evolving MBSE to Enable the Digital Future with David Long

    Description

    For over 10 years, the systems engineering community has focused on transforming from document-centric to model-based techniques. But the challenge is not to transform systems engineering. The challenge is to transform the holistic engineering lifecycle. How must we evolve model-based systems engineering to enable the digital future?

    Video Link

      Evolving MBSE to Enable the Digital Future with David Long
  • 'Analyzing and Specifying Interfaces with MBSE' with Fran McCafferty

    Description

    Responding to an external signal, publishing a message on the system bus, accounting for thermal stress across a connection. From assessing interactions across the system boundary to specifying the details of a connector between components, systems engineers must consider and define connections from logical, physical, and functional perspectives. Interaction among system elements drives system performance, and good interface design is often the difference between system success and failure.

    Learn how model-based systems engineering provides a toolbox of techniques and representations to support good interface design from first concept to detailed implementation. Refresh your understanding of the fundamentals and theory behind system modeling of interconnections, and see a practical demonstration of good interface design in GENESYS to deliver system success.

    Note: This webinar has GENESYS 5.0-related content.

    Video Link

      'Analyzing and Specifying Interfaces with MBSE' with Fran McCafferty
  • 'Improving Healthcare Delivery through Systems Engineering' with Zane Scott

    Description

    At the recent INCOSE International Workshop in Jacksonville, Florida, the Healthcare Working Group sponsored a forum on designing and improving healthcare delivery processes. Participants were invited to share their approaches, the various advantages and disadvantages, and to explore ways in which the different approaches might interact and leverage each other. In this webinar, Zane will share some of the perspectives and learnings from the forum and discuss a path forward.

    Video Link

      'Improving Healthcare Delivery through Systems Engineering' with Zane Scott
  • 'Getting Started on Enterprise Architectures' with Ron Kratzke

    Description

    The phrase “enterprise architecture” does not have a clear definition in technical and engineering literature, yet we have job titles and business activities in many organizations that use this term. This webinar explores the meaning of the term as well as the role system engineers have in the development of enterprise architectures. The benefits of doing enterprise architecture will be covered along with an exploration of three key architectures supporting an enterprise architecture – operational, programmatic, and system architectures. The webinar will also provide a demonstration of methods and work products needed to begin the development of an enterprise architecture using GENESYS.

    Note: This webinar has GENESYS 5.0-related content.

    Video Link

      'Getting Started on Enterprise Architectures' with Ron Kratzke
  • 'SE 101: Fundamentals of Architecting' by David Long

    Description

    Hillary Sillitto frames the goal of architecting as delivering “predictable outcomes in complex endeavors.” Spanning problem and solution, black box and white box perspectives, behavior and structure, successful architecture is a blend of art and science. As systems become more complex and our environment becomes more dynamic, it’s more important than ever to understand the fundamental context of system architecture as well as the principles, concepts, and processes that underpin the practice if we are to deliver fit for purpose solutions for the challenges of today and tomorrow. To do so sets the big picture – for the systems we engineer and the systems practice we advance.

    Video Link

      'SE 101: Fundamentals of Architecting' by David Long
  • From Decision Analysis to Mindfulness: Letting Go to Improve System Development

    Description

    The sunk cost trap is a key concept in decision analysis. It indicates that decisions should be made based on future prospects, not on past investments. Letting go is a key mindfulness principle. It advocates not holding on to the past so that our wellbeing concentrates fully in the present. Both concepts—decision analysis and mindfulness—share the same essence: sometimes it is better to avoid enforcing past decisions, so that the best can be exercised from now into the future.

    In this webinar, decision analysis and mindfulness come together to explain how those concepts are essential to successful system development. Engineers tend to be emotionally attached to their designs and decisions. Managers unquestionably stick to contractual agreements. However, the nature of system development is dynamic and uncertain. Hence, several of those decisions may become irrelevant as a system’s development progresses. Holding onto them in these cases becomes either a waste of project resources or an obstacle to capitalizing on present or future opportunities. We will examine positive and negative industrial experiences that resulted from embracing or not embracing these concepts. Examples will cover all phases of the system’s life cycle: opportunity identification, requirements elicitation, system architecture, system implementation and acquisition, integration, verification and validation, and deployment and operations.

    Video Link

      From Decision Analysis to Mindfulness: Letting Go to Improve System Development
  • GENESYS 5.0 – A Day in the Life of a Chief Systems Engineer

    Description

    This webinar will discuss issues that arise in the course of work for a Chief Systems Engineer. The engineer is faced with a set of daily and weekly questions that need to be addressed. Our Chief System Engineer is fortunate to work in an MBSE environment where his integrated approach allows quick response in real time in meaningful ways that consider the context and organizational complexity of an engineering team. Our presenter, Ron Kratzke, will explore these challenges and demonstrate methods using GENESYS 5 that enable the Chief System Engineer to meet them.

    Note: This webinar has GENESYS-related content.

    Video Link

      GENESYS 5.0 – A Day in the Life of a Chief Systems Engineer
  • 'Systems Engineering to Go' with Zane Scott

    Description

    Systems engineering grew up in the mil-aero market space. This shaped the discipline in a number of ways. For several decades, the practice developed and grew in a space with plenty of opportunity and revenue for practitioners. But the market space is changing. Funding is shrinking and the nature of warfare is swinging away from the need for large, complex physical systems. This is pressuring the traditional systems engineering market space.

    This webinar will explore some of the possible responses to this pressure and the obstacles to those responses. Systems engineers are faced with the need to think differently about their discipline. The purpose here is to help practitioners see opportunities in non-traditional markets and enable communication with potential customers. Meeting the challenges of breaking out of the traditional space is no insignificant undertaking, but it can be done.

    Video Link

      "Systems Engineering to Go" with Zane Scott
  • 'Ensuring Design Integrity through Executable Behavior Architectures and Parametric Constraint Analysis' with Ron Kratzke

    Description

    Good systems engineering requires a blend of innovation and engineering rigor. Creative pictures disjoint from engineering reality are a prescription for failure.

    This webinar highlights two dimensions of GENESYS which bring high-value analytics to your MBSE endeavors from day one of the project. With the executable behavior architecture of GENESYS, as you visually construct your system model, you will see how to directly execute your model – no code-behinds required. The result is a virtual system prototype enabling you to continuously simulate your systems engineering solution throughout the project, ensuring logical validity and overall system performance. Combined with this is a rich, yet natural method of representing the key parameters of your design and their corresponding interrelationships – the physics that govern your engineering solution. When connected to an analytical design environment such as MATLAB, these parameters seamlessly connect the architectural and analytical dimensions of systems engineering, accelerating your engineering while ensuring design integrity.

    Video Link

      "Ensuring Design Integrity through Executable Behavior Architectures and Parametric Constraint Analysis" with Ron Kratzke
  • 'Collaborative Model-Based Systems Engineering' with Fran McCafferty

    Description

    Systems engineering is a team sport, not an activity performed in isolation. Engineering a system requires multiple systems engineers to concurrently engage with a diverse set of customers, users, managers, and subject matter experts across a breadth of concerns and considerations. Success requires strong collaboration – among systems engineers and across the greater project team.

    This webinar will focus on collaborative MBSE with GENESYS, delivering the right blend of methodology and tool support to improve the elicitation, capture, and communication of knowledge. Built upon a single source of truth integrating concept of operations through requirements, behavior, architecture, and test, GENESYS maintains real-time communication and alignment between systems engineers with everyone working from the latest information at all times. But it doesn’t stop there. Leveraging a blend of representations tuned to different audiences and a number of integrated connectors – with specialty tools such as IBM DOORS and productivity tools such as Microsoft Excel and Project – GENESYS enables the broader project team to represent their data their way, in an environment and a representation that is native to them. The result is enhanced communication and alignment across the project team, increasing team engagement and enhancing project effectiveness.

    Video Link

      "Collaborative Model-Based Systems Engineering" with Fran McCafferty
  • 'From Concept to Design: Making MBSE Real-Time' with Ron Kratzke

    Description

    Adopting model-based systems engineering (MBSE) offers organizations transformative benefits in quality and time to market. Unfortunately, many fail to achieve these results as they needlessly make the implementation of MBSE far more complex and costly than necessary.

    This webinar will focus on effective MBSE practices with CORE and GENESYS, enabling your team to improve the systems engineering journey from concept to design. Leveraging an integrated set of structured and SysML representations, we will show how the right approach supported by the right tool will streamline your efforts to elicit information, analyze the problem, explore alternatives, develop the solution, and document the design. Blending visual model construction designed for systems engineers with an integrated environment spanning requirements, behavior, architecture, and test, the right MBSE solution becomes a natural extension of your engineering team, easing the burden of systems engineering while enhancing the value.

    Video Link

      "From Concept to Design: Making MBSE Real-Time" with Ron Kratzke
  • 'Failure Modes Effects Analysis (FMEA) in Model-Based System Engineering (MBSE)' with Ron Kratzke

    Description

    Failure Modes Effects Analysis (FMEA) is an approach for identifying the possible failures in a design, product, or service. The FMEA process is used by many design teams to examine and improve their system architecture. In some commercial industries, a FMEA is required as a part of the product certification prior to product release.

    This webinar will examine an approach for extending the model-based schema to capture key elements of the FMEA, failures and causes, and methods for relating the elements to the system design. Once a structure for capturing this information is provided, the webinar will examine options for ordering the failure modes and consequences based on occurrence and detectability, and options for producing FMEA reports.

    Note: This webinar has GENESYS-related content.

    Video Link

      "Failure Modes Effects Analysis (FMEA) in Model-Based System Engineering (MBSE)" with Ron Kratzke
  • 'Educating Engineers or Training Technicians?' with Zane Scott

    Description

    Those of us engaged in instruction, be it live or web-based, are often asked to provide “practical examples” of the principles and techniques we are discussing. There is an intense desire to focus on application and avoid theory or concepts. The examples requested are deemed “practical” to the extent that they resemble the requester’s practice area. This seems practical and focused at first blush, but it disguises an underlying learning/teaching problem.

    When we learn a discipline from the perspective of narrow, specific applications, we seriously limit the possibilities for using our knowledge. This webinar will explore the problem and its limitations and propose a perspective for breaking out of the paradigm that pulls us there.

    Note: This webinar has no CORE-related content.

    Video Link

      "Educating Engineers or Training Technicians?" with Zane Scott
  • 'How to Engineer a System of Systems Using CORE' by Fran McCafferty

    Description

    Establishing the framework for affordability is key in applying model-based systems engineering. Legacy systems are increasingly challenging to maintain in light of obsolescence, and Mission Systems Engineering objectives provide a direct on-ramp to system lifecycle affordability through modularity and competition.

    Application of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) enables program offices to completely establish clear subsystem boundaries, capabilities, performance, and physical characteristics. MBSE will also enable straightforward technology insertion (New Missions), and obsolescence mitigation (Sustainment). MBSE provides the methodology and infrastructure to achieve the objectives. A secondary MBSE benefit is to enable program offices to compete subsystem upgrades and replacements that include small business participation. Competition at the subsystem level for major procurement items allows the government to compete acquisitions at the subsystem level, leading to improved capability at a better price.

    Note: This webinar has CORE-related content.

    Video Link

      "How to Engineer a System of Systems Using CORE" by Fran McCafferty
  • 'The Systems Challenges of Cyber-Security' by Jeff Sili

    Description

    Cyber-security engineering principles are typically considered after the design phase of the DOD acquisition process. For Navy combat system acquisitions programs, for example, cyber-security evaluations typically have been evaluated during a process called Platform Information Technology (PIT) Risk Approval (PRA) for systems that do not touch the Global Information Grid (GIG). This PRA process provides an identification of the Information Technology (IT) accreditation boundary including hardware, software, internal and external communication exchanges, listing of Information Assurance (IA) deficiencies, the risk mitigation for each risk identified and the mitigated residual risks with associated risk charts. With the introduction of a new process called Risk Management Framework (RMF) for DOD IT systems and the application of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) controls for other IT commercial systems, cyber-security can be applied more effectively and efficiently to identify IT security requirements early in the acquisition process to influence the design phase. These controls will apply to multiple system/components and can be classified as technical, physical or procedural. The system engineering process needs to shift, with the emphasis on tracking these RMF controls and security requirements. The process will go on to track the multiple relationships in the design phase which is accomplished using CORE. This is the missing link to effective cyber-security implementation in the system engineering phase of the DOD acquisition process.

    Note: This webinar has CORE-related content.

    Video Link

      "The Systems Challenges of Cyber-Security" by Jeff Sili
  • 'Reimagining Systems Engineering' by David Long

    Description

    Today’s challenges continue to grow in complexity, and the pace of change continues to accelerate. Traditional engineering disciplines are evolving to meet these challenges but struggle to do so successfully from within their silos. At the same time, systems engineering seeks to transform itself to model-based approaches, but far more is required. If systems engineering remains as it is today, we are on the short road to irrelevance. It’s time to move beyond the art of systems engineering and our traditional base of practice and engineer our place in meeting the grand challenges of the 21st century.

    Note: This webinar has no specific CORE or GENESYS-related content.

    Video Link

      "Reimagining Systems Engineering" by David Long
  • Systems Engineering Architectures: Requirements, Capability Architecture, Operational Architecture, System Functional Architecture, and System Physical Architecture

    Description

    In this webinar, we will present a system engineering approach that involves considering the requirements and the four basic architectures, namely the capability architecture, the operational architecture, the system functional architecture, and the system physical architecture. We will discuss important considerations when developing these architectures. Then, we will discuss how to relate requirements to these architectures and how to relate the architectures to each other. This will enable the development of a complete system that meets both the requirements and the needs of the customer.

    This presentation will have an avionics focus and will feature tools such as Vitech CORE and the Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF). However, we will discuss the approach in a way that enables it to be adapted to any domain.

    Video Link

      Systems Engineering Architectures: Requirements, Capability Architecture, Operational Architecture, System Functional Architecture, and System Physical Architecture
  • Real-Time Design Solutions in GENESYS with Ron Kratzke

    Description

    When engineering systems, it is critical to identify the constraints that restrict and govern the design. As the design takes shape, we must move beyond individual constraints to understand the interrelationships in the form of engineering formulas and equations that further impact the overall system solution. It is the thoughtful consideration of this series of constraints that brings good analytical rigor to both bound and inspire the design process.

    Historically, we managed these equations separately from the solution architecture, working in stand-alone analytical tools to check various aspects of the design. This was a manual process that involved moving the key design parameters out of the system model, conducting the analysis using a mathematical toolset (MATLAB), and then returning the results to the architectural model. Costly and error-prone, this approach slowed and limited the engineering of systems. We no longer need to take this manual approach. Applying a true model-based approach with modern systems engineering tools can allow us to bypass a manual approach and enable real-time design solutions.

    Leveraging a connector between the architectural model in GENESYS and the analytical power of MATLAB, systems engineers validate system design constraints in real-time while developing the system solution. This webinar will review the architectural approaches and corresponding GENESYS capabilities that identify system constraints, capture objective and threshold values, detect inconsistencies, and graphically represent the key equations governing the system via the constraint block definition diagram and the parametric diagram. Then, powered by a new GENESYS connector, we apply the analytical power of MATLAB to solve this series of equations based upon the current design and update the design state.

    Bringing together the power and innovation of MBSE in GENESYS with the analytical rigor of MATLAB delivers real-time design solutions, empowering the team to accelerate and improve the engineering of systems.

    Video Link

      Real-Time Design Solutions in GENESYS with Ron Kratzke
  • Systems Engineering Your MBSE Deployment by David Long

    Description

    Model-based systems engineering is many things. It is architecture and analytics. It is communication and engineering. It is methods and tools. Fundamentally, it represents a change in technique and fidelity for systems engineering and those who practice it. The one thing that MBSE is not is one size fits all.

    As individuals and organizations deploy MBSE, they fall into several traps. Many believe model-based systems engineering to be a tool or technical problem. While there is certainly a technical dimension and selecting the proper tool for the problem and process is key, the adoption of model-based systems engineering is far bigger. It is technology, people, training, and change at an individual, project, and potentially organizational level.

    If we practice what we preach and bring a systems engineering approach to deploying MBSE, we can fundamentally change the impact and increase the likelihood of success. Assessing the environment and drawing the system boundary…defining the scope, eliciting requirements, and identifying constraints…considering behaviors and deploying the solution – all are critical to defining the right problem and solving the problem right. All are key in avoiding many of the traps along the way. Building upon good systems engineering practice and practical lessons learned from deployments across industry – some successful, some challenged – we can identify best practices going forward as we continue to apply and advance systems engineering within our organizations.

    Video Link

      Systems Engineering Your MBSE Deployment by David Long
  • 'The Key to Systems Engineering Success' with Zane Scott

    Description

    The sine qua non of systems engineering is the systems view. Attempting systems engineering without it leads to no more success than pushing your riding lawn mower back and forth across your yard because you can’t find the key to start it. Yet, we too often see projects undertaken with fragmented or missing views of the overall system. This webinar explores the nature and value of a true systems view, how we get it and how we can go astray.

    Video Link

      "The Key to Systems Engineering Success" with Zane Scott
  • 'Industry Standards Compliance using MBSE' with Ron Kratzke

    Description

    In many industries the product development team must show that they have met the requirements of a set of regulatory standards in their system design to an auditing or regulatory agency prior to product deployment. Not only does the design have to “comply” with a regulation or standard, in some cases the regulatory authority asks for evidence that the system has been tested and certified to meet the standard.

    Additionally, many times the goal of a product development team is to make a single product that can be used in more than one application. This means that the end product may have to comply with more than one regulatory regime.

    MBSE is the application of modeling to support system engineering requirement, design, analysis, verification, and validation activities by including these areas in one data repository. Much has been explored in how to apply MBSE to basic system design. Extending MBSE principles to provide traceabilty and compliance to industry standards allows the system engineer to leverage the model to provide traceability to the industry standard vice using manual traceabilty methods.

    This webinar will explore a schema for model based management of industry standards to demonstrate traceability and compliance of the system design. With the ability to connect the fundamental system design (in the model repository) to multiple industry standards, the system engineering manager will benefit by gaining in-depth traceability of design compliance and verification in system testing.

    Using the connected model will enable the system engineering team to answer any number of compliancy based questions such as:

    • Which standards and specific requirements are included in the system design?
    • From the system design perspective, what standards does the system comply with?
    • How was the system tested to insure compliance to the standard?
    • How does the system meet the requirements of Standard “A” and Standard “B”?

    Video Link

      "Industry Standards Compliance using MBSE" with Ron Kratzke
  • 'GENESYS for CORE Users' by Sara Sumner

    Description

    Are you a CORE user interested in learning more about GENESYS? Are you a systems engineer looking for a modern, comprehensive, integrated model-based systems engineering solution?

    If so, this presentation is for you!

    For over 20 years, Vitech has provided systems engineers with CORE, a comprehensive, integrated model-based systems engineering environment delivering rich capabilities to enable project insight and team collaboration. CORE has been the systems engineer’s work-horse, built with lessons learned from 40 years of engineering excellence and implemented in thousands of projects world-wide. It was the first and only tool to bring a comprehensive and integrated approach to model-based systems engineering. Until now…

    GENESYS, Vitech’s next-generation software, brings the invaluable insights from 20 years of systems engineering with CORE, leveraging modern technologies in an open architecture. The result is the power of a full MBSE environment with the usability of modern office tools integrated with your desktop, engineering, and enterprise environments.

    So which tool is right for you?

    Join me for the webinar to discuss the differences between GENESYS and CORE, migration from CORE to GENESYS, and the value GENESYS brings to the systems engineering community.

    Video Link

      "GENESYS for CORE Users" by Sara Sumner
  • 'The Value of Model-Based Systems Engineering' with Mark Simons

    Description

    Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) represents a new approach for conducting systems engineering. MBSE promises to transition away from a document-based approach for recording systems engineering artifacts to a more integrated and automated approach centered on a common system model. Despite the promised advantages of MBSE it is often difficult to convince management of the value MBSE provides.

    This presentation discusses three case studies of MBSE conducted for the USMC. For each case study, the presentation discusses what problems or issues were addressed by MBSE, how MBSE was employed, and the resulting success of the MBSE implementation. MBSE delivers high value for helping stakeholders communicate and understand each other, improving product quality, and ultimately improving the cost, schedule, and performance of the projects.

    In the first case study engineers applied MBSE to help stakeholders understand the inherent functionality of legacy applications and a new prototype system that deal with Full Motion Video (FMV) analysis. In the second case study engineers were able to define and confirm their mutual understanding of the operational environment for the system and define a preliminary system design. In the third case study engineers were able to understand system dependencies and relationships with desired intelligence gathering capabilities better using MBSE. MBSE helped to provide more clarity in the analysis. Also, engineers tied defined capabilities for USMC intelligence gathering to the portfolio.

    MBSE offers value to systems engineering organizations by helping tie disparate system engineering artifacts together and make the artifacts accessible in a central data repository. When systems engineering artifacts are organized around a system model communication improves, saving time, product quality improves, saving money, and ultimately the system-under-design meets more of the user needs, improving system performance.

    Video Link

      "The Value of Model-Based Systems Engineering" with Mark Simons
  • 'Connecting MBSE and Project Management' with Ron Kratzke

    Description

    Closing the gap between program management and systems engineering is a key challenge highlighted in The Guide to Lean Enablers for Managing Engineering Programs, May 2012, published by the joint MIT-PMI-INCOSE Community Practice on Lean Program Management. The ability of the Chief System Engineer to work in harmony with the Project Manager is a key indicator of a well-managed and successful acquisition program. However, the system engineer is focused on technical merit and the program manager is focused on budget and schedule. The result is that many times what has been placed in the project plan is disconnected with what the technical team intuitively understands as the schedule for delivery of the system design and product.

    What is needed is a way for the System Engineer to connect the system design information directly to project schedule and tasks.

    This presentation explores the development of a schema to traditional MBSE design information to the program management elements from a Work Breakdown Schedule (WBS).

    Video Link

      "Connecting MBSE and Project Management" with Ron Kratzke
  • 'Connecting GENESYS to Analytical Engineering Tools' with Gareth Digby

    Description

    Model-based systems engineering (MBSE) seeks to increase the visibility of systems engineering information while at the same time reducing errors through the use of a central model that is accessible to all those involved in the engineering process. The systems engineers and discipline engineers are able to use the central model as they undertake their engineering tasks. However, the MBSE applications are not able to support all the detailed numerical analysis that systems engineers and the discipline engineers need to undertake as part of their design activities.

    Traditionally detailed numerical analysis has required the movement of information between applications, typically as part of a manual process. This can lead to the introduction of errors. In addition, the information is likely to be resident in multiple locations and therefore it is hard to keep the information synchronized.

    This webinar describes the connection of systems engineering models to analytical engineering and other applications, so the data can be used directly without the need to transfer via files. The improvements this leads to in visibility and communication between the systems engineering team and the stakeholders is discussed.

    Video Link

      "Connecting GENESYS to Analytical Engineering Tools" with Gareth Digby
  • 'Introducing GENESYS 4.0' by Sara Sumner

    Description

    Please join us as we introduce the newest member of the Vitech product line, GENESYS 4.0.

    Video Link

      "Introducing GENESYS 4.0" by Sara Sumner
  • 'Beyond MBSE: Looking towards the Next Evolution in Systems Engineering' by David Long

    Description

    For almost 10 years, the systems engineering community has been focused on the transformation from document-centric to model-based techniques. While most systems engineering organizations have completed pilot efforts, established appropriate communities of practice, and are plotting their path forward, this transformation is far from complete. In terms of the Roger’s innovation adoption lifecycle, we are beyond the early adopters, in the early majority, and moving towards the tipping point where model-based systems engineering becomes the expected framework and approach for systems engineering.

    Systems engineering remains a young discipline – one that must continue to learn and evolve, one where transitions should be viewed as waypoints along a journey rather than destinations themselves. While work remains to ensure the transformation to model-based techniques is both efficient and effective, it is time for the systems engineering community to begin looking beyond MBSE. When model-based is simply the way organizations practice systems engineering, what is the next evolution required to address next generation problems and deliver the organizational value required? How must the systems engineering practice evolve? What can we begin doing today – even in the continued implementation and adoption of MBSE – to prepare ourselves and our organizations to make that transition? Looking at the journey to date and the opportunities in the future, how can we characterize the next leg of the journey and plot a path forward for ourselves, our organizations, and the greater systems engineering practice?

    Video Link

      "Beyond MBSE: Looking towards the Next Evolution in Systems Engineering" by David Long

  • 'MBSE and the Cloud: A Model for IT Delivery' with Gareth Digby

    Description

    Cloud IT infrastructure and services offer many options when delivering enterprise IT solutions. To achieve an optimal solution the architecture will have to balance a variety of factors including the use of infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), platform-as-a-service (PaaS), software-as-a-service (SaaS), etc.

    Using an example of a Learning Management System, the webinar will demonstrate a model showing how:

    1. Network bandwidth and data size can be included to understand the behavior of the solution with different loads;
    2. Different solution configurations of PaaS, SaaS, etc., can be maintained in the model as the options are evaluated.

    Video Link

      "MBSE and the Cloud: A Model for IT Delivery" with Gareth Digby
  • Engineering Creativity

    Description

    the The full creative problem-solving process employs two kinds of thinking: divergent and convergent. The best solutions are the result of using and supporting both in a robust way. Systems engineering focuses on the convergent process and most, if not all, of the disciplines, tools, and methods support convergent thinking. This results in an opportunity cost in terms of undiscovered alternatives and constrained solution quality.

    But this cost is not inevitable. Systems engineering can and should support the divergent phase of the problem-solving process. This webinar will describe what is required to provide that support and make some suggestions on how to begin. In an unusual venture into the “soft” side of the early stages of problem solving we will explore some suggestions for making a more robust and productive process leading to higher quality solutions.

    Video Link

      Engineering Creativity

  • Embry-Riddle, NASA CubeSat, and Vitech's CORE: Taking off with MBSE

    Description

    The Embry-Riddle EagleSat program took off in 2012 with the approval of the university’s satellite development proposal as part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative. The student-run, professor-guided organization has a goal of flying Embry-Riddle’s first satellite, a fully functioning 10-centimeter cube focused on analyzing the susceptibility of computer memory to solar radiation while also mapping the body’s orbital decay over time. The systems engineering effort, undertaken through the use of Vitech's CORE University Edition, has played a critical role in requirements management and maintaining design traceability throughout the development process and across all six subsystems. The choice to use CORE comes from its ability to document complex element relationships while easily and fully communicating these to other team members through generated reports and descriptive diagrams.

    Video Link

      Embry-Riddle, NASA CubeSat, and Vitech's CORE: Taking off with MBSE
  • INCOSE’s Vision 2025 at Vitech: Embracing and Meeting the Challenge

    Description

    "The vision for systems engineering in 2025 is shaped by the global environment, human and societal needs, policy and business challenges, as well as the technologies that underlie systems." INCOSE Systems Engineering Vision 2025: A World in Motion.

    The INCOSE Systems Engineering Vision 2025: A World in Motion opens with those expansive words. They are expansive because they see well beyond systems engineering’s military-aerospace roots into its new role in the 21st century. By grasping the essential concepts of our discipline the authors envision the application of system engineering’s tools and methods to problems across the spectrum of our society. They see a discipline no longer limited to hardware and software design but venturing into areas of natural and social systems facing the challenges of policy-making in a complex world. This vision is exciting to us at Vitech. The expansions hold opportunities that transcend just the economic potential from expanded markets to include real future-changing challenges with opportunities for significant contributions to our society.

    This webinar seeks to highlight some of the ways that Vitech understands the new vision and how we plan to meet the challenges. Join us as we explore the vision and its meaning.

    Video Link

      INCOSE’s Vision 2025 at Vitech: Embracing and Meeting the Challenge
  • The ROI of CORE and GENESYS

    Description

    Too often we see our purchase of tools and adoption of methodologies as part of the expense of executing a project. In reality, our tools and methods are an investment in our ultimate success. Along the path to that success we can measure the return on that investment. As vendors and advocates for our CORE tool we are regularly asked for measures of that return.

    In this webinar we will present the results of our research into the question of the Return On Investment (ROI) for CORE and GENESYS. In doing this research we have been very careful not to overstate the return. Where there were assumptions and choices to be made we have selected the most consrvative path in each instance. The result is a balanced picture of the ROI for CORE and GENESYS.

    Our VP of Professional Services, Zane Scott, will present the research and our conclusions. This webinar will provide a grounding for making purchase decisions or justifying the continued use of the tool. We are sure you will find it both interesting and helpful.

    Video Link

      The ROI of CORE and GENESYS
  • Maximizing the Student Experience with CORE

    Description

    Join Customer Care Specialist Bethany Maddox and Communications Manager Katie Thacker as they share opportunities to maximize the student experience with CORE 9. Directed at instructors in the Vitech University Program, this webinar will discuss recent developments in CORE as they are relevant to classroom work, an overview of the suite of resources available to help students get started quickly in CORE, and insights on teaching MBSE to students at varying experience levels.

    Video Link

      Maximizing the Student Experience with CORE
  • States and Modes with Charles Wasson

    Description

    Vitech is pleased to welcome special guest Charles Wasson, author, instructor, and consultant, as he explores the finer aspect of States and Modes in Systems Engineering.

    System Phases, Modes, and States are often one of the most controversial concepts in System Engineering due to a lack of definition and implementation standards. In fact, Modes & States are addressed AFTER the design is completed when User Manuals are being developed. The reality is: Modes & States serve as a key analytical framework early in System Development, especially in Conceptual Design.

    Four issues contribute to the challenges of implementing System Phases, Modes, and States:

    • Issue #1 – What is the difference between a "mode" and a "state."
    • Issue #2 - Do "modes" contain "states" or do "states" contain "modes"?
    • Issue #3 - Should specifications specify "modes and states"?
    • Issue #4 - Should specifications flow down "modes and states" as explicit requirements?

    This webinar presents a Statement of the Problem, identifies sources of the problem, proposes clarifying definitions, and provides illustrative examples of "modes" and "states". Building on the foundational definitions, the presentation explores the entity relationships (ERs) between System Phases, Modes, and States. Then, illustrates how Modes & States serve as linking mechanisms between System or Entity specification requirements and the conceptual design to Command & Control (C2) sets of a System Architecture’s capabilities to produce the specified performance-based outcomes.

    Based on solutions to Issues #1 and #2 that fuel the controversy, this webinar addresses the final two issues – i.e., Issues #3 and #4 - concerning specifying and flowing down "modes and states" in specifications. We conclude with a summary of recommendations concerning the four issues and provide suggestions for effective SE leadership to properly apply and implement System Phases, Modes, and States.

    Video Link

      States and Modes with Charles Wasson
  • Test and Evaluation in CORE

    Description

    The webinar will explore a schema for a model -based management of system V&V activities beyond the "traditional" Verification Cross Reference Matrix (VCRM) required in system requirement documents. This extension will explore options for test activity planning and resourcing of test events, test event tracking, test risk management, and test plan progress.

    We will demonstrate how to answer the following questions using the V&V facility built in to CORE:

    • What is the overall time required to complete a series of test events?
    • What concerns and risks do we have in our system test plan?
    • What resources to do we need to complete the system test events?
    • How can we shorten the time required to complete a testing sequence?
    • How to monitor the progress made on completion of system testing?

    Video Link

      Test and Evaluation in CORE
  • Systems in Systems Engineering

    Description

    What can systems engineers learn from a physicist turned evolutionary biologist and a couple of business professors? Although it may not be apparent at first blush there are significant professional similarities that span these disciplines. In particular, Fritjof Capra, Peter Senge and Russell Ackoff (among others) offer cogent commentary on a topic of critical importance to systems engineers in today’s world- the importance and centrality of the systems view. The engineer’s interventional tools and techniques offer solutions to go with the understanding brought about through the more observational systems disciplines. But our heritage as an engineering discipline makes it easy to slip from the holistic view into the analytic emphasis on components. This webinar offers an overview of how we got here and looks anew at the need to take a “systems view.” By drawing on the other systems disciplines systems engineering can expand its horizons (and its economic opportunities) into any areas where complex problems seek systemic solutions. Our goal is to inspire a quest for new thinking tools and to push the practice of systems into those new fields of endeavor.

    Video Link

      Systems in Systems Engineering
  • Demonstrating Compliance Using MBSE

    Description

    There are two types of compliance: Process compliance and design compliance. Process compliance is required when a specific series of development steps must occur to ensure that the design activity addresses all required aspects. Typically, a document describing the development effort is used as the measure of compliance. Process compliance then answers the question, “Did the development effort follow the required steps?” This document may either be an industry standard documenting the process, or an internally-developed process that the organization has agreed to adhere to.

    Just as process compliance is concerned with whether or not the development adhered to procedural steps, design compliance is concerned with whether the system, as designed, satisfies all of the imposed regulatory and technical requirements. Design compliance answers the question, "Does the system satisfy regulation x, and if so, how?" Vitech’s CORE and GENESYS model-based systems engineering (MBSE) tools each satisfy both process and design compliance.

    This 1-hour webinar will demonstrate how the CORE MBSE tool can be used to demonstrate compliance during your development effort with a minimum investment, cost and time. You will learn how compliance can be demonstrated as a by product of other systems engineering activities when using an integrated MBSE platform. Learn how process audits can be performed and passed with almost no preparation, and how processes may be easily repeated from project-to-project.

    Video Link

      Demonstrating Compliance Using MBSE
  • Introducing GENESYS 3.0: Boost Performance in the World of Open Architecture

    Description

    Vitech is announcing the next generation of GENESYS - the fastest way to fully integrate your system with the freedom of open architecture. GENESYS is able to connect, build, and produce faster than ever. Join Vitech systems engineer Warren Smith as he presents on the newest features and capabilities of this newest GENESYS release.

    Video Link

      Introducing GENESYS 3.0: Boost Performance in the World of Open Architecture
  • Insight Through Integration: The Future of the Vitech Solution

    Description

    Vitech strongly believes that systems thinking and approaches are the key to solving worldwide problems large and small. Our mission is to equip systems practitioners with the best methodology, tools, and resources to help them tackle those challenges. This requires us to face the forces of apathy, complacency, expediency, and inertia in our quest to spread the message of insight through integration.

    Zane Scott, Vice President of Professional Services at Vitech, will be presenting a special webinar on the future of the Vitech solution as it grows to better serve traditional systems engineering strongholds as well as other market segments that are starting to learn the value of systems approaches.

    Video Link

      Insight Through Integration: The Future of the Vitech Solution
  • 'Engineers Behaving Badly' by Zane Scott

    Description

    What is the real role of the logical (functional) architecture in systems design or improvement? There are lots of different viewpoints across a broad range. Some engineers regard the logical architecture as important in constructing trial physical architectures. Others eschew the use of behavior, claiming to allocate requirements directly to components without resorting to any functional analysis at all.

    This presentation makes a case for the importance of good, sound functional design. Ultimately it is the system behavior that fulfills the needs of the stakeholders. In this webinar we will discuss the role of behavior in the process of system design and the importance of the logical architecture in the design thought process.

    Video Link

      "Engineers Behaving Badly" by Zane Scott
  • Leadership Insights

    Description

    What is your leadership style? It had better be one that fits the circumstances! A leader with a single "style" is in trouble because leaders don't get to define the circumstances in which they will exercise leadership. Their style must fit the needs of the setting. For example, leading a creative brainstorming session in a group of professionals calls for an entirely different style than leading a tactical team through a dynamic entry into a hostile situation. But the same leader is often called on to lead a team of professionals in designing training exercises as well as breaking down doors in live-fire situations. Two situations -- two different styles.

    Video Link

      Leadership Insights
  • Exploring DoDAF and Other Architecture Frameworks in CORE by Ron Kratzke

    Description

    The CORE toolset includes a Systems Architecture schema developed to support the Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF) description.

    This webinar will discuss the origins of operational and system architecture principles and the overall approach taken by CORE to support development of operational architectures. The presentation's focus will be on the organization of DoDAF, one of many architecture framework descriptions available in CORE and methods for populating the CORE system architecture schema.

    Main Takeaways:

    • Gain an understanding of the organization of the architecture schema
    • Learn how to populate the architecture schema
    • Learn how to produce DoDAF views from CORE
    • Understand the application of the CORE architecture schema for development of operational architecture in non-DoD-based enterprises

    Video Link

      Exploring DoDAF and Other Architecture Frameworks in CORE by Ron Kratzke
  • Responding to Fire and Emergency Services with Model-Based Capability by Michael Brett

    Description

    Natural disasters and emergency incidents in Australia's largest state are handled by Western Australia's Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES). Delivering effective emergency services requires the synchronized effects of a number of elements which must be integrated into a coordinated operational environment. DFES has recently undertaken a program to implement model-based techniques to support acquisition, management, and organization of the department's capabilities. Vitech's CORE is currently at the heart of this effort and its future is grounded in Vitech's GENESYS. In this webinar, the benefits and challenges of using this approach for the first time in this critical new application area will be discussed.

    Video Link

      Responding to Fire and Emergency Services with Model-Based Capability by Michael Brett
  • CORE's Integrated Toolbox: Delivering SysML with Integrity and Efficiency

    Description

    Although a set of SysML drawings provides several perspectives of a system design, there is no assurance that the system is feasible if we base our decisions solely on these drawings. The SysML drawings communicate the system design to a very select audience, namely systems or software engineers. However, these representations may not be appropriate for the project manager or the product stakeholders and provide no information on how the system production or verification will be accomplished.

    Starting from a series of SysML views, this presentation will show you how the fundamental features of Vitech's CORE software easily allow the systems engineer to go beyond the graphical views in SysML.

    You Will Learn To:

    • analyze the system functionality
    • develop written documentation
    • provide the project team monitoring tools
    • plan for system verification

    Video Link

      CORE's Integrated Toolbox: Delivering SysML with Integrity and Efficiency
  • Systems Engineering in Turbulent Times

    Description

    Emerging needs... rapidly changing requirements... dynamic environments... ever-increasing connectivity... evolutionary and revolutionary technologies... budget crises... shrinking schedules. The practice and profession of systems engineering emerged from the development of large, stand-alone, single-purpose systems. Today we face an ever-shifting landscape and operate across a wide range of size, cost, and product lifespan. As technologies continue to advance and dynamic complexity grows, what role does systems engineering place in solving problems today and tomorrow? How do we adjust and evolve our practice to deliver greater value in turbulent times?

    Video Link

      Systems Engineering in Turbulent Times
  • Specifying Systems Using SysML in CORE

    Description

    Did you know that model-based systems engineering (MBSE) pre-dates the Systems Modeling Language (SysML)? Prior to SysML, MBSE powered systems design with consistency checking, document generation, and other benefits using notations such as functional flows, N2 diagrams, and IDEF-0 diagrams.

    The ascent of SysML has provided a common notational language that facilitates communication of the system design between systems engineers, software engineers, and others.

    In this webinar, you'll see a system specified entirely using SysML in CORE. You'll be amazed at the benefits you get when SysML is powered by an underlying model.

    What Will You Learn?

    • Learn how to model using SysML in CORE.
    • Find out how to better communicate your SysML diagrams to customers and other stakeholders who are not familiar with the SysML notation.
    • Discover how to find omissions in your SysML models and how to relate your SysML to other critical systems engineering facets such as risk assessment, testing, and program management.
    • Become more familiar with virtual system prototypes and the ability to simulate your system activity diagrams.

    Video Link

      Specifying Systems Using SysML in CORE
  • Characteristics of Model Based Systems Engineering

    Description

    The rise of model-based systems engineering (MBSE) has greatly reduced the risk and cost of building complex systems at the organizations that have embraced it, with profound implications for many industries worldwide.

    MBSE can be implemented in different ways by different tools. This fast-paced presentation will describe MBSE and Vitech's approach. This approach, integrating requirements with behavior, with architecture, with simulation, and with Verification and Validation dramatically reduces inefficiencies. It ensures absolute consistency among team members as the system is engineered and reduces technical ambiguity during the system design.

    This tool-agnostic, fast-paced presentation will define the characteristics of model-based systems engineering and explain the benefits of MBSE. As one INCOSE Houston Chapter member said after attending this presentation at an INCOSE event, "I've been going to presentations on MBSE for 2 years. For the first time, though, I finally understand what MBSE is all about!"

    Video Link

      Characteristics of Model Based Systems Engineering
  • Systems Engineers - the Logical Choice to Lead

    Description

    This webinar will discuss the role of systems engineers as leaders. It will explore the skill areas that the systems engineer/leader should put into the toolkit in order to meet the challenges of leading teams of professionals on their quests for systems solutions to a wide variety of problems.

    Zane Scott declares, "Systems engineers are the most logically-oriented professionals to lead design teams."

    Scott, who is in the midst of presenting a 20-part series on systems engineering leadership for INCOSE, will discuss the areas of biggest challenge facing the leader: communications, conflict management, and decision-making. The webinar will offer references to resources in all of these areas.

    Scott believes that the view of a leader must be a systems view. It isn’t possible to catch a vision from some narrow perspective. It is the ability to know "the right things" among all that might be done that sets leaders apart. In the world of designing system solutions, the existing system (or lack thereof) becomes the "as-is" and the vision of the "to-be" is the solution under design. To lead the design from the former to the latter requires the leader’s system view. System engineers are those people on the team uniquely positioned to have that view.

    The first step for leaders seeking to increase their effectiveness is awareness of the challenges and tools. This webinar is designed to create that awareness and connect the participant with sources for further development.

    Video Link

      Systems Engineers - the Logical Choice to Lead
  • How CORE 9 Contributes to Systems Engineering Success - The Business Case

    Description

    Creating value while minimizing waste is every engineer's goal. In this high-level overview, you will learn how using Vitech's CORE 9 software will bring value, clarity, completeness, and precision to avoid unnecessary rework and cost escalation.

    In this 45-minute program, Zane Scott and host Jim Obermayer will discuss the advantages of using a sophisticated tool that connects all domains so that systems engineers can deliver the best value for complex products across the entire lifecycle.

    "Engineers have cost-conscious minds," Scott says. "During these days of cost containment, the business case for model-based systems engineering (MBSE) driven tools must be made as engineers seek ways to reduce risk and program delays. The time has come for MBSE to be recognized for the LEAN framework it is in helping to deliver value to the customer as forecasted."

    It's all about managing the flow of information through the tool, connecting behavior with requirements and architecture, and then verifying and validating the design back against the requirements. All this must be done in such a way that details are not lost and are addressed early enough in the lifecycle.

    Scott declares, "CORE keeps the engineer on time and on budget while allowing her to use skills and talents to develop and deliver complex products."

    What Will You Learn?

    • Solid evidence that projects that apply mature systems engineering best practices perform better than projects that don't.
    • How CORE software supports best practices called out by the latest SEI Effectiveness of Systems Engineering Study as those leading to a high probability of project success with respect to cost, schedule, and quality.
    • Examples of how MBSE using CORE leverages the best practices that lead to mature systems engineering and the resulting project success.
    • The business case for using CORE as the foundation of your mature systems engineering practices and project success.

    Video Link

      How CORE 9 Contributes to Systems Engineering Success - The Business Case
  • Learn how to supercharge your projects with CORE 9

    Description

    Are you a CORE user? Have you worked with CORE in the past, using CORE 7, 6 or, even earlier versions? You won't believe the changes since then!

    Dozens of CORE alumni came by our INCOSE IS booth this year who hadn't seen CORE for several years. They were blown away by features introduced in CORE 8 and 9.

    We realized right then and there: We need a webinar for CORE users that aren't familiar with the significant advances in the last two releases. That's why we're hosting this special program for you, CORE alumni.

    In this 50-minute program we are inviting thousands of CORE users to learn how CORE 9, building on CORE 8, has supercharged systems engineers to work at think speed. Come see the control you could have from the single design authority provided by a truly integrated MBSE platform.

    What Will You Learn?

    • How drag-and-drop diagrams let you build models and traceability as quickly as you can conceptualize your system.
    • How advanced navigation ensures CORE tracks your thinking as you build your system.
    • How to generate Microsoft Excel ® dashboards to track your program metrics, progress and risks.
    • How auto-generated reports can be auto-delivered - straight to your inbox.
    • How you can build entirely new systems via drag-and-drop using CORE's re-use library capabilities.
    • How CORE now identifies design omissions during analysis, preventing design defects during integration.

    Video Link

      Learn how to supercharge your projects with CORE 9
  • Making the Business Case for Systems Engineering

    Description

    There is published evidence that those who use systems engineering and model-based systems engineering for projects produce better project performance. More pointedly, research shows that program cost over-runs are due to systems engineers' failures to deliver on time and on budget with the expected quality. These weaknesses are often caused by a failure in siloed systems engineering implementation and the tools used to manage the project.

    There are many articles and papers to support the fact that systems engineering best practices lead to better quality outcomes with lower risk and fewer cost over-runs late in the game.

    In this fast-paced 40-minute program, Vitech host Jim Obermayer interviews Zane Scott, author, speaker, and Vice President of Professional Services at Vitech Corporation. Scott and Obermayer discuss the role that MBSE tool selection, specifically CORE 9 and GENESYS 2.0, plays in helping the systems engineer consistently reach a manageable, predictable outcome.

    Video Link

      Making the Business Case for Systems Engineering
  • Modeling the Management of Systems Engineering Projects

    Description

    Presented by: Daniel Spencer

    This presentation will outline an example of how a model-based systems engineering approach in Vitech's CORE product can be taken to represent the systems engineering management aspects of a project, and how the resulting engineering management model can be interrogated to produce the outputs required for a quality SEMP. After describing the underlying structure of the systems engineering management model, an example will demonstrate its use, with a focus on activities taking place in Concept Engineering phases of a project.

    Video Link

      Modeling the Management of Systems Engineering Projects
  • Theatre of Operations: An Entertaining Problem

    Description

    Presented by: Tommie Liddy

    Effective needs analysis requires complete understanding of the users and how they act as operational performers, their roles, and the organisations to which they belong. This presentation provides an entertaining yet rigorous example and uses colloquial language to describe in readily understood terms a robust needs analysis methodology that is effective, efficient and also complaint with the Australian Defence Architecture Framework (DAF). The example demonstrates the application of a model-based approach to concept engineering and, in particular, how a better understanding the "performers" leads to a solid basis on which to design a solution.

    Video Link

      Theatre of Operations: An Entertaining Problem
  • Experiencing the Systems Engineering Process as a Serious Game

    Description

    Presented by: Nick B. Szirbik

    Creativity in engineering design is impossible to teach or convey in a traditional manner to students. We (at University of Groningen) have experimented in teaching design in the engineering of systems with techniques borrowed from serious gaming, which is a methodological approach which already made successful inroads in various business domains or school teaching. In such a design game, teams of three students play simultaneously the roles of customers, designers, and design auditors. CORE is used as a communication and design tool in this game.

    Video Link

      Experiencing the Systems Engineering Process as a Serious Game
  • Come See What's New in CORE 9!

    Description

    The much-anticipated release of CORE 9 delivers improved speed, agility, and integration in CORE's well-established model-centric environment. CORE's unique full design accountability and traceability capabilities haven't changed - but we have added many new features to give users more control and faster response time.

    What's New

    • Unprecedented model management through cross-project relationships gives you virtually infinite flexibility to partition your team's effort along process, contractual, baselining, and IT boundaries.
    • Seamlessly interface with IBM® DOORS® through the new DOORS Connector.
    • Enriched representations, including the state transition diagram and further enhancements, allow you to generate presentation-ready graphics directly from the engineering repository.
    • Systematic identification, management, and use of critical design parameters make it easy to reduce risk and increase efficiency.
    • Enhanced capabilities to monitor and exploit your system design.

    Video Link

      Come See What's New in CORE 9!
  • Stand on Standards

    Description

    Presented by: John O. Clark

    Clarity of language and a common understanding of desired results are vital to any successful engineering effort. Different disciplines within the engineering world have developed different standards and models that define their processes and terms. These different views have been instantiated through professional organizations and governing bodies associated with different disciplines and constituents. Understanding the differences between standards, models, processes, and terms used by various engineering disciplines is vital to successful inter-disciplinary efforts. Multiple views provide a comprehensive view.

    This presentation will discuss the fundamentals of systems engineering from the perspective of the standards and governing bodies that developed those standards. The presentation will discuss the definitions of a systems engineering terms and how the various definitions developed by EIA, IEEE, and ISO differ. We will explore the various SE processes and system life-cycle models developed by EIA, IEEE, and ISO, and the requirements and relationships of a successful systems engineering effort.

    A the conclusion of this presentation, the attendee should have a clear understanding of the differences, commonalities, and relationships between various common systems engineering terms, processes, and life-cycle models, and a framework for enabling projects among co-operating organizations.

    Video Link

      Stand on Standards
  • Risky Business - How They REALLY Do It: Results of Sysenex Inc. Risk Management Market Survey

    Description

    Presented by: Laurie Wiggins

    The results of a recently completed market survey provide insights into risk identification and risk management attitudes and practices for large, medium and small businesses predominantly in the aerospace domain. Responses to questions will be discussed to include risk methods and tools used and their strengths and weaknesses, and risk management attitudes and practices of organizations.

    Risk management is a key process for helping a program to achieve cost, schedule, performance and safety objectives. Common risks across programs and risks unique to a given program and/or domain are discussed. Risks learned through past experience and taken from lessons learned are also addressed.

    Video Link

      Risky Business - How They REALLY Do It: Results of Sysenex Inc. Risk Management Market Survey
  • Approximation Analytics for Model-Based Systems Engineering

    Description

    Presented by: William D. Miller

    Model-Based Systems Engineering is susceptible to classic curse of dimensionality challenges for the three types of system development approaches: top-down, middle-out, and bottom-up. The application of approximation, or back-of-the-envelope, analytics are proposed for estimating and bounding system attributes. Approximation is appropriate in the following circumstances: 1) lack of time, 2) data is unavailable, 3) data is unknowable, and 4) inherent uncertainty does not warrant precision. Approximation analytics examples are illustrated for complex infrastructure, aerospace/defense, and consumer electronics systems.

    Video Link

      Approximation Analytics for Model-Based Systems Engineering
  • Adding System Analysis and Visualization to MBSE by Integrating AGI's Systems Tool Kit (STK) with GENESYS

    Description

    Presented by: Michael Bruchanski

    This presentation will discuss an integration example between STK and Vitech's GENESYS software. Beginning with the use of a custom schema within GENESYS we will examine how to align the data models to efficiently exchange data. Once the data model is set then we can examine how to utilize the various APIs to facilitate bi-directional communication between the two commercial software tools. This direct interface will allow the user to create a functional representation of their system in STK to preform engineering studies and provide a 2D and 3D visualization for communicating the results to stakeholders. GENESYS is used to take the data and apply the MBSE process and rigor required to complete the development of the system.

    Video Link

      Adding System Analysis and Visualization to MBSE by Integrating AGI's Systems Tool Kit (STK) with GENESYS
  • Introducing GENESYS 2.0 : Operate at Think Speed

    Description

    Vitech is announcing the next generation of insight. Faster and more powerful than before, GENESYS 2.0 delivers real out-of-the-box value. New diagrams and robust representations give you more control and faster response, while still utilizing the proven STRATA approach. Join Vitech's systems engineer, Warren Smith, and VP of Sales and Marketing, Jim Obermayer, as they dive into the latest capabilities and innovations, highlighting many exciting new features of the next generation of the GENESYS software.

    What's New?

    • Operate at think speed: Build diagrams on the fly with the ability to drag and create new constructs directly in your diagram.
    • Richer reports: The reporting framework that was already easy to build and customize is now even easier to exploit with an extremely rich, vastly capable toolbox to build your custom reports.
    • New diagrams: We've rounded out the diagram set with N2, Interface N2, and Physical N2.
    • Additional SysML representations: To round out the existing SysML diagram set, GENESYS 2.0 now includes the Use Case Diagram and the Package Diagram.
    • Added richness in an enhanced diagram framework: GENESYS 2.0 gives you the capability to drop constructs directly onto behavior diagrams, replacing icons with images, to make it easier to construct your model from the diagram views.
    • New major reporting formats: The SDD (System Design Document), SSS (System Segment Specification) in addition to the existing DoDAF artifacts, are now at your fingertips.

    Video Link

      Introducing GENESYS 2.0 : Operate at Think Speed
  • World of Systems

    Description

    Systems Engineering lives in a world where systems are studied and appreciated from a variety of viewpoints. There are biological, chemical, physical and other systems existing in the universe. Humans have created systems which interact with the natural world and with each other. Numerous disciplines and sciences study and seek to design, redesign and alter systems and their interactions.

    In the area of human systems there are the disciplines of systems science, systems thinking, systems dynamics and, of course, systems engineering. There has been surprisingly little work around the foundational similarities and differences in these disciplines and they ways they view and interact with systems.

    Tools and techniques that are currently the province of one or another of the disciplines will come to the attention of forward thinking practitioners in the other areas. This will lead to an expansion of the ways in which systems professionals can serve their markets. A focus on cross disciplinary study will lead to an increase dialogue among the systems disciplines which will result in advancing the state of development in all of those disciplines. This move toward a "systems community" can only enrich and enhance the theory and practice for all.

    This webinar will attempt to shine a light on the map of those disciplines and their world. It will point to the existing thought work as well as to the areas open for investigation. It will suggest the value propositions around the inquiry and advocate for further journeys into this realm.

    Video Link

      World of Systems
  • Systems Engineering Lite

    Description

    An approach is presented (termed Systems Engineering Lite) in which systems engineering is adapted to address small to medium sized projects by combining the roles of project manager and systems engineer and by utilizing a simplified set of systems engineering tools. This approach brings the systems engineering benefits of managing complexity and increasing communication and understanding of the system to a wider range of companies, industries, and project sizes than is traditionally the domain of systems engineering. Our experience has been that this approach results in reduced project costs, happy customers, and more successful projects.

    Video Link

      Systems Engineering Lite
  • Faster, Better, Cheaper - The Fallacy of MBSE?

    Description

    Scope, time, and cost - the three fundamental constraints of a project. Project management theory holds that these three dimensions are inextricably linked as competing constraints. To complete a project faster must sacrifice budget or scope (whether explicitly through reduced capability or implicitly through lower quality). Likewise, to complete a project at lower cost inevitably results in longer schedules or reduced capability/lower quality. As the standard saying goes today, "faster, better, cheaper - pick any two."

    Today, with the rise of model-based systems engineering, the concept of faster-better-cheaper has re-emerged, albeit under new monikers. As we seek to transform the practice of systems engineering to better face the complexities and constraints of today, we must ensure that we maintain our own balance. We must promise improved results in order to justify the cost - and the risk - of adopting new practices. However, we must ensure that we don't over promise and under deliver, or the legacy of MBSE will be landmark failures rather project success.

    As we seek to justify the adoption of new technologies and new approaches, are we simply falling into an old trap? Or, through a skillful blend of systems engineering and project management approaches, can we actually achieve the vision of faster-better-cheaper? If so, what frameworks must we adopt as systems practitioners and what changes must we make as project managers?

    Video Link

      Faster, Better, Cheaper - The Fallacy of MBSE?
  • Leveraging Service-Oriented Architectures with MBSE

    Description

    The service-oriented architecture (SOA) is a powerful tool in today's environment. It can leverage the power of services and their delivery to the enterprise. But in the process of designing and building SOAs there is an often overlooked concept that is fundamental to their power. As the name implies, SOAs must "serve" something. That something is the set of enterprise business processes. Yet, SOAs are often constructed without more than a cursory understanding of those processes. Model-based systems engineering holds a solution to this oversight in its ability to create a robust model of the process layer that can then drive the creation of an SOA that will actually serve the processes.

    This webinar will address the need for eliciting and modeling the structure of the processes to produce the needed insight that will tie the services to the processes.

    Video Link

      Leveraging Service-Oriented Architectures with MBSE
  • How to Reduce Risk and Go Beyond Requirements

    Description

    Requirements Management is good as far as it goes. It is necessary, but not sufficient for developing complex systems. Many organizations have invested heavily in software to manage requirements while neglecting the tools to analyze those requirements, to derive those requirements, to allocate the requirements, or to validate the requirements. Failure to address any of these areas greatly increases your risk. Your risk can be reduced by using a total solution software product that operates from a single shared repository.

    In this 43-minute webinar, you will understand the threats of a disjointed, siloed engineering approach and how to avoid cost over-runs, late projects, document muddles and architecture that doesn't implement the system behaviors, interfaces or performance that users actually need.

    Video Link

      How to Reduce Risk and Go Beyond Requirements
  • The Power of Iterative Interviews in Modeling Existing Systems

    Description

    Increasingly, systems engineers are challenged to develop models of existing systems. This is critical in developing replacement systems for legacy products or processes (reverse engineering), building improved systems in situ (middle-out engineering) as well as for developing a comprehensive understanding of context systems which will contain the system of interest to the design project at hand.

    Using a series of iterative interviews combining the SIPOC framework from Six Sigma with the layered approach to mastering complexity it is possible to rapidly develop a clear picture of systems in operation. The resulting model is developed with a strong ownership interest on the part of system stakeholders- an interest that obviates the need for "back-end" selling of proposed changes and modifications to the system owners. Improvements developed from models "owned" by the stakeholders have a high rate of acceptance among those stakeholders over changes introduced by experts who have "studied" the system and its needs.

    These interviews can be conducted with a pace that generally exceeds the ability of the stakeholders to participate and vet the developing models. With the increasing need to understand the context, interface with legacy systems and improve rather than replace existing systems the opportunity to develop models and see them accepted quickly is a critical advantage.

    This presentation discusses the iterative interview approach, the necessary skills and techniques and provides practice tips drawn from actual experience.

    Video Link

      The Power of Iterative Interviews in Modeling Existing Systems
  • 5 Steps for Improving Your Systems Engineering Practice

    Description

    Today's business environment calls for system development practices that are both effective and efficient. In an increasingly complex world business cannot afford to waste valuable resources on solutions that do not respond to their stakeholders' needs. The design process must deliver the right answer to the right question. That means the process must be effective in producing a system solution.

    In addition, the rapid pace and scarcity of resources in most project efforts necessitates that the design effort arrive at the right solution quickly and by consuming only those resources necessary to accomplish its purpose. This means that the process must not only be effective but efficient. How to be both efficient and effective is a critical conversation for every problem-solving enterprise.

    This webinar offers 5 very practical steps for improving both the effectiveness and efficiency of your systems engineering process. By integrating them into your process you can manage your limited resources in a way that gets the most "bang for the buck" from your design effort. Join us for a useful and engaging half hour!

    Video Link

      5 Steps for Improving Your Systems Engineering Practice
  • 9 Laws of Systems Engineering

    Description

    Systems engineering is becoming increasingly important in today's business world. Even in businesses and industries where the term "systems engineering" is unknown, the need for someone to guide the overall design and maintenance of business products and processes is becoming apparent. Business cannot afford to develop products that won't meet their customers' needs or implement processes that will not "plug into" their business needs.

    The job of the systems engineer (with or without that title) is to see that products and processes hit their targets. Meeting customer needs and improving the quality of their own business processes is critical. Sound systems thinking and systems engineering is governed by nine foundational truths or laws of systems engineering.

    Video Link

      9 Laws of Systems Engineering
  • Document the Model, Don't Model the Document

    Description

    The document is a universally accepted method for conveying information when defining complex systems. It allows a wide range of stakeholders to comprehend the areas that pertain to their interests; however, a document lacks explicit traceability. To capture and maintain that information there has been a consistent rise in the use of computer models to support the definition and design of complex systems. While being useful to clearly define and manage interactions of the stakeholders, system and environment within the systems engineering team, the model is often a mystery to those not involved in its creation. This lack of clarity has led to an ideological battle between document-based and model-based systems engineering, with the former group claiming better understanding and communication and the latter claiming clearer, consistent and traceable definition. However, all systems engineering is model based, with the model either in the systems engineer's head or in a software tool. This 'basis' argument does not address that which is important: whether the focus is on the document (document-centric) or on the model (model-centric).

    This paper proposes that there is a continuum of centricity when using a model-based systems engineering tool; from entirely document-centric where the tool is used to model the systems engineering documents required, through to entirely model-centric, where the tool is used to make a model of and about the system, then this model is reported upon to create the document. A basic example describes two points on this continuum. The authors further propose that a model-based, model-centric approach provides a range of benefits; the systems engineering effort can go towards defining the system, gaining the benefits of rigour, traceability and consistency, and that views of this information can be produced, often as documents, allowing clear communication with a range of stakeholders.

    Video Link

      Document the Model, Don't Model the Document
  • Effective SE Communication through Models and Representations

    Description

    Models and representations have always been cornerstones of engineering, systems engineering included. Regrettably, rather than bringing clarity, the rise of model-based systems engineering has brought increased confusion and conflict regarding models and representations. Given the inherent breadth of systems engineering as we connect stakeholders and technical experts, we require the richest representation set possible. Rather than engaging in religious wars, we must continuously seek to expand our engineering toolkit to better understand, analyze, and communicate. And we must seek to integrate these seemingly diverse representations as perspectives of an underlying systems model rather than as distinct products and endpoints themselves.

    Surveying the multitude of system representations available -- SysML and traditional, logical and physical, contextual and technical, systems and beyond -- we will connect a diverse set of representations to each other and, most importantly, to the common underlying model. We will highlight various representations, each with their specific content and strengths. These strengths lead to preferred usage contexts and scenarios as part of a continuum of perspectives on the systems model. Leveraging these strengths, we will describe the constructive role these representations can play in a customizable, coherent, and powerful toolkit to address the systems challenges of today.

    Video Link

      Effective SE Communication through Models and Representations
  • Empowering the Organization Through Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

    Description

    Systems engineering must be tightly integrated with the entire organization to have the correct impact on the product development lifecycle. Cost, risk, and performance assessments early and often are critical to the ongoing success and health of a program. Systems engineers sit at the center of this capability but to date have been ill equipped to rapidly iterate and respond to changing constraints or "what-if" scenarios in configurations.

    The introduction of model-based systems engineering (MBSE) arms the engineer with more effective tools to input more information rapidly, synthesize the requirements, constraints, and schedule drivers, and iterate with meaningful feedback on cost and risk drivers. By instituting a centralized model-centric approach, the systems engineering organization is in a better position to integrate with the rest of the organization. A common model used by decision makers drives the program with defensible output instead of intuition.

    Video Link

      Empowering the Organization Through Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)
  • Leverage New CORE 8 Features to Enrich Your MBSE Approach

    Description

    This session will cover the latest enhancements to CORE product line, focusing on visualization improvements that enable clarity of communication to the combined team and stakeholders. Emphasis will be on demonstration of the new feature set, the value to the user, and the path to securing the latest version of CORE.

    Video Link

      Leverage New CORE 8 Features to Enrich Your MBSE Approach
  • Leveraging CORE 8 University Edition

    Description

    This webinar will provide a high level overview of some of the most impactful new features in CORE 8 University Edition. We will start with some of the changes you'll notice the moment you open CORE 8: Facilities, Perspectives and Packages. We will then talk about how the Model Assistant works for you and the many visualization enhancements in CORE 8. We'll round out the hour by overviewing the new collaborative capabilities in CORE 8 University Edition.

    Video Link

      Leveraging CORE 8 University Edition
  • Highly-Connected Systems Engineering for the Enterprise with GENESYS

    Description

    Simplify the shift to model-based systems engineering by connecting your enterprise engineering groups with GENESYS. The effective integration of data sources to feed the system engineering process is critical to arriving at the right solution. Combining a proven modeling approach with an enterprise-ready architecture, GENESYS integrates across your team so that you can focus on winning more business and delivering architectural excellence.

    Video Link

      Highly-Connected Systems Engineering for the Enterprise with GENESYS
  • Delivering Systems Studies Faster and More Thoroughly with CORE 8

    Description

    Whether you are performing a one-month study or a long-term architecture design, project success depends on getting started quickly, finding the right solution, and adjusting to program changes. With over 20 years of dedicated systems engineering, Vitech can help demonstrate the value of model-based systems engineering in an integrated software environment. Presentation will cover overview of MBSE and how to successfully make the transition to a model-centric design approach.

    Video Link

      Delivering Systems Studies Faster and More Thoroughly with CORE 8
  • Open Modeling Environment Delivers the Power of Layered MBSE to the Enterprise

    Description

    With the ever-accelerating pace of change, responding adeptly and delivering rapidly is essential to business today. Through model-based systems engineering (MBSE), leading companies are transforming their practices and harnessing the collective power of their organization to deliver innovative solutions, revolutionary products, and project success. Connect your enterprise and simplify the shift to MBSE with GENESYS. Combining a proven modeling approach with an enterprise-ready architecture, GENESYS integrates across your team so that you can focus on winning more business and delivering architectural excellence.

    Presentation will cover overview of GENESYS and how to successfully guide your enterprise through the transition to a model-centric design approach.

    Video Link

      Open Modeling Environment Delivers the Power of Layered MBSE to the Enterprise
  • On the Use of MBSE for Infrastructure Planning: Modeling Dynamic Systems for Real-Time Monitoring

    Description

    This presentation focuses on applying the concepts of model-based systems engineering to the modeling and simulation of key components of critical infrastructures. Specifically, we look at ways to leverage a model-centric approach for dynamic systems that must support real-time monitoring and notification. These classes of systems are found in a wide range of applications from DoD to biomedical to supporting infrastructures.

    Example Demonstration: A traffic monitoring system designed for large municipalities will be used as an example to highlight the MBSE approach and Vitech's methodology for solution. We will walk the listener through the construction of the model and the execution of the simulation to demonstrate trade-off studies and cost/performance analysis.

    Video Link

      On the Use of MBSE for Infrastructure Planning: Modeling Dynamic Systems for Real-Time Monitoring
  • A Customer Perspective, Aerospace Concepts

    Description

    Aerospace Concepts Pty Ltd is an Australian systems engineering consultancy which specializes in complex projects. A key component of their business is employing a model-based systems engineering approach (using CORE) to support Australian Defence capability development.

    Video Link

      A Customer Perspective, Aerospace Concepts